Martine Breteler

Luscii welcomes Fenna in her new role as Research Assistant

 

We are very happy to announce that this week a new Research Assistant started at Luscii! Fenna Jonker, who’s currently finishing her Bachelor’s degree in Health Policy and Management at the Erasmus University, will assist Luscii’s team with conducting different research projects.

A number of hospitals in the Netherlands have started with the Experience phase of Luscii telemonitoring. To gain insight in the feasibility of telemonitoring of patients with Heart Failure or COPD, different research projects with care professionals are being conducted. This will make it possible to learn and see whether adaptations are necessary to the current care pathway of the hospitals to prepare and scale remote patient monitoring. Fenna will help us with gathering, structuring and analyzing these data.

Fenna considers continuing a master’s degree in Healthcare management. In the meantime, she hopes to learn here more how eHealth solutions can be implemented successfully for different hospitals. “I am also very curious to learn more from a business perspective, since I don’t have any experience as a student yet”.

Good luck Fenna!

A great start for Luscii for COPD at Medisch Spectrum Twente Hospital

MSTPatients with COPD of the Medisch Spectrum Twente Hospital will now have the opportunity to receive Luscii telemonitoring to support their at-home care and reduce the risk of hospital readmissions. I was at the kick-off meeting with patients and talked to them and their doctors and nurses.

Last week, on Tuesday 11th September, the official Kick Off with COPD patients, their relatives and care professionals took place in Enschede. Patients were shown how to use the iPad with Luscii monitoring and Luscii videocare at home and are now familiar with the term ‘telemonitoring’.

MST – one of the biggest hospitals in the eastern part of the Netherlands – starts with an Experience phase first, where patients with a history of frequent hospitalisations will be monitored at home. To gain insight into the feasibility of telemonitoring for these patients, I will lead a study together with the care professionals in the hospital. Since this new way of providing care to patients is quite exciting to both patients and care providers, we expect to retrieve some initial answers on the added value of telemonitoring from this research.

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Chantal van der Linde, pulmonary care nurse, explains that she “hopes to be able to intervene in case of deterioration much earlier”. And to “offer a better safety net to patients”.

Patients are looking forward to starting with home monitoring. When asked what they expect from telemonitoring, one patient explained that they hope for “less hospital admissions, I already had two in a row recently”. Another patient added: “I believe that this makes contact with the nurse much easier and quicker, now I often call when it’s already too late”.

“It is difficult to address the effect of telemonitoring within the first 25 patients we start with”, explains Dr. Hekelaar, pulmonologist. “But I’m curious to see to what extent we can keep patients out of the hospital”.

We are all very excited to start and are looking forward to experiencing the use of telemonitoring in practice!