Nicola Campbell

Treant’s COPD patients are all set to receive home consultations via Luscii

Imagine no longer having to go to the hospital, but simply having a conversation at home with your lung nurse about how you feel. From February 2019, this will become a reality for 25 Treant patients with the chronic disorder COPD (lung disease). During this month, the healthcare group will begin a trial in which patients receive a tablet, on loan, through which they can transfer their medical information to the hospital. If this information requires further discussion, the lung nurse will contact the patient via ‘video calling’.

Treant, in collaboration with the healthcare innovation company Luscii, is starting this pilot to gain experience in monitoring COPD patients from a distance. Lung specialist, Steven Rutgers, is pleased with the new scheme: “For patients who already have less energy because of their illness, it is of course fantastic that they will no longer have to come to the clinic every time. This pilot also strengthens our vision to concentrate care as close to the patient as possible. It is great that we can experiment with this possibility.”

How does it work?

Every week, patients use the tablet to fill in their information, such as blood pressure, weight and physical activity. They also report how they are feeling. They then send this information to the hospital. A specialist nurse will take a look at the data and, if necessary, will contact the patient. Through the use of ‘video calling’, healthcare professionals can see how the patient is doing and, in consultation with the pulmonologist, can adjust the medication if necessary.

COPD

COPD is a lung disease in which the lungs are damaged. The lungs cannot absorb sufficient oxygen, leaving the patient with shortness of breath and less energy. COPD is characterised by lung attacks that often lead to hospitalisation. Rutgers: “As we receive information about the condition of the patient more often during this pilot, we hope to prevent such lung attacks and subsequent hospital admissions”.

Zilveren Kruis

The pilot was made possible by healthcare insurer Zilveren Kruis and will last for six months. The pilot reinforces the agreement that Treant holds with the healthcare insurer to develop initiatives that bring care closer to the patient. A good example of the right care in the right place. In collaboration with the healthcare innovation company Luscii, scientific research will also be conducted into the results of remote monitoring. To start with, remote monitoring will be available to just 25 COPD patients treated at Scheper in Emmen. If the pilot proves successful, in the future, more patients will be able to pass on information to the hospital via video calling.

This press release was published by Treant ziekenhuis on 4 December 2018 (https://bit.ly/2RhyywZ)

 

Luscii starts at Jeroen Bosch Hospital: “More control by staying at home”

When keeping an eye on your health, you do not always have to go to the hospital. The home measurement of, for example, heart rate, blood pressure and weight, is on the rise. And that is a positive development; as it gives people more control over their health. The Jeroen Bosch Hospital is therefore starting a trial of home measuring for people with heart failure and patients with the chronic lung disease COPD. The trial will run for six months and is a collaboration between the Jeroen Bosch Hospital and Luscii, the hospital branch of FocusCura.

A total of fifty people will take part. One participant is Mrs. Liefmans*, who lives with COPD. Twice a week, she will measure her heart rate and saturation (amount of oxygen in the body) from the comfort of her easy chair. In addition, she will complete a digital questionnaire; has she had any difficulty breathing in the past few days? How much has she moved? All the information that helps indicate the status of her health.

All data is sent digitally to her lung nurse, Joke Spierings, in the Jeroen Bosch Hospital. Has something deteriorated? Then she can contact Mrs. Liefmans immediately via video calling on a tablet. “By monitoring more often, we can spot a potential lung attack earlier. This way we can take action together and prevent any hospitalisation”, says Spierings.

 

“Thanks to home measurement, I know exactly how I am doing”

Previously, Mrs. Liefmans did not have such a precise insight into her health. She went to her GP and visited the pulmonary doctor for a check-up once a year. She only saw her lung nurse in the hospital after a lung attack.

“If I did not feel well, I often thought: it’s not too bad, I’ll see how it goes and then visit the doctor”, says Mrs. Liefmans. “But, by that time it was too late, and before you know it, you’re in hospital”. She was still there three months ago. Thanks to home measuring, she expects that this will no longer happen so quickly. “I want to be able to take steps earlier, so that my health does not deteriorate further. Thanks to home measurement, I know exactly how I am doing. That gives me peace of mind. And because I can always consult with my nurse if things get worse, I feel that I really have control”.

Luscii video smart contacts list

Spierings is also enthusiastic: “This program supports self-management of people. Thanks to the information provided by home measurements, and advice from our side, patients are able to make the right choices. Taking control of your health despite being ill; that is our goal.”.

* Mrs. Liefmans is a fictitious name.

 

This press release was published by Jeroen Bosch Hospital in Dutch on 29 November 2018 (https://bit.ly/2RhyywZ)

3 steps-model for the successful introduction of e-health

Even our deputy prime minister, Hugo de Jonge, is calling for more speed when it comes to e-health, for example, with home measuring. But where do you start? In this article, we provide an action plan to help you make the right choices with the current healthcare purchases for 2019.

This action plan is based on a combination of practice and science. I learned by trial and error during projects with both FocusCura and Luscii. I studied ICT implementations during my PhD at the University of Twente. This is how I discovered that successful implementations almost always follow a fixed pattern.

My most important lesson: a successful implementation is determined by the execution. The transformation of a dream into the reality of new daily care. Thomas Edison already said it best: “Vision without execution is hallucination”. So, let’s get started!

Preparation: define your dream and be specific

Start by making your dream concrete. Do you wish to give your clients more independence by staying at home with technology as an alternative to the care home? Do you, as a hospital, want to prevent unnecessary admittance for chronic patients?

You don’t have to come up with everything yourself, there are many good examples inside and outside the sector that can inspire you. Make your dream tangible for your organisation or department. Who are you doing it for and at what point will you consider it a success?

There is a big pitfall that I have often fallen into on this point. If you share your dream with care recipients and caregivers, you will notice that organisational limitations or financial restrictions will become the guiding principle. So, turn this around. Discuss your dream and find out whether they share it, but also show leadership to align the preconditions with your preferences.

Step 1: choose your partners and gain experienceNow it is time to involve others. Like the insurer. And partners that can offer competencies that you do not have. And no, in the year 2018 this is not the domain of the purchasing or IT department. It is a strategic choice. Does your partner already have agreements with insurers that you can take advantage of? Which partners can bring practical experience so you don’t have to reinvent the wheel? Choose a partner that suits your culture, as you are about to embark on a journey with one another.

Together, you begin with a proof of concept. As a first step to learn how your vision works in practice. At Luscii, we call this the experience phase. We approach the care process differently with around 25 care recipients by using our technology. That number is small enough to not have to disturb things too much. Yet it is still large enough for users to experience whether this will give them what they need. The dream comes to life and the caregivers involved become frontrunners, or idea champions, as I labelled them in my thesis.

After around four months, you can evaluate whether your idea works and create a follow-up plan to mix up the care path, which will involve financial agreements and technical integrations. If it appears in the evaluation that it does not work, then make alterations or stop. The latter sounds hard but I see many projects that remain dormant and that makes no sense. Show leadership in these cases and keep going, or stop and start again. If you continue, this also means that you choose not to keep the innovation free of obligation.

Step 2: continue and eliminate thresholds

Now that you are continuing, progress to around 150 users. This intermediate step is conscious. At this scale, it is impossible to do everything ‘on the side’, so your care path now changes completely. But with this intermediate step, you can keep the change manageable.

In this phase, you will invest more, for example, in a project leader or time for caregivers to work on new protocols, ICT integrations and/or training. Don’t be afraid to stick your neck out here, but also continue to measure whether you are achieving your goals.

At Luscii, we do this by measuring three-monthly parameters, such as satisfaction of patients and caregivers, reduction of clinic visits and admissions, and the amount of time Luscii saves for nurses. With the help of a ‘data dashboard’, you can monitor continuously and compare outcomes with data from other healthcare organisations. So that you can learn from one another.

Step 3: new service is a reality

Now you are ready to change the direction completely. If all has gone according to plan, you have now reached a critical number of care recipients and caregivers involved in shaping the new working method.

By making small interim steps, you have shifted from ‘innovator’ to ‘early majority’ in the innovation model. The ‘project’ is over and your new service has become a reality. Your idea champions, the caregivers of the first hour, are probably already eager for the next stage. In current times, innovation never stops. You will start step 1 again after step 3 is complete: constant innovation is the future for continually meeting the wishes of clients, employees and everyday reality.

The future is now

If you want more tools to make e-health a success, take a look at the Playbook that we made with Menzis or download my thesis. Do you have suggestions for improving the approach yourself? If so, I am very curious to hear your thoughts.

This blog was published earlier in Dutch on Qruxx tech: https://tech.qruxx.com/drie-stappen-voor-succesvolle-introductie-van-e-health/?_ga=2.15733042.529853116.1543238273-1213197350.1530525548

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